Posted on Leave a comment

5 Reasons to Relish your Fear this Halloween

5 Reasons to Relish your Fear this Halloween

Be afraid, be very afraid

It’s that time of year again when we surround ourselves with fearsomely carved pumpkins (and orange covered chocolate).

Being afraid isn’t all bad though. Here are 5 ways that being made to tremble could actually help you out.

1. Being scared alerts you to harm

We will start with the obvious. Fear is a natural instinct designed to help you avoid dangerous situations. Think of it as an alarm bell.

When we get scared, our bodies react physically so we can handle the danger, also known as our fight-or-flight response  – that sudden rush of adrenaline which allows you to move faster or become stronger than you thought you were.

It is a basic survival instinct.

2. A Little Can Help you Achieve your Goals

Two things can happen when we become afraid. We can face our fear, or we can run away from it.

Identifying our fears can help alert us to areas in our lives that we are limiting ourselves. For example, a fear of rejection may be poisoning our relationships. Being able to stand up to fear and overcome it is one of the best ways to grow as a person.

3. It can Help you in a tight Squeeze

When that adrenaline comes, a tight deadline is approaching, or you are just running out of time to complete a deadline.

The acute stress that accompanies fear can actually be good in these situations. It keeps you up, helps you focus and gives you more drive to complete the task before the time is up.

4. A lot of People Actually Enjoy it

Roller coaster rides, Halloween, haunted houses, skydiving, bungee jumping, scary movies or even skiing, all of these things inject us with huge amounts of fear and we as humans relish the vigour of the adrenaline rush that comes with it.

5. Fear can help us become closer to people

Remember when you and your partner flicked on a scary movie and huddled together? Fear is a powerful emotional and physical response and sharing the experience with someone can help you become closer. Not to forget the excuse to get close to them.

Harnessing the hidden powers of fear

We all have negative associations with the idea of fear, but as we’ve seen it is useful to help give us drive, avoid dangerous situations and fill us with the buzzing thrill of adrenaline.

However, it can be detrimental. Most people have an irrational phobia of some sort, whether it’s Acrophobia (heights), Arachnophobia (spiders), Agoraphobia (having a panic attack in public), or Mysophobia (germs). These can be debilitating and cause damage to quality of life.

So, when it comes to making the most of your fear this scary season, you need to face up to it (within reason), ride the wave of adrenaline that comes with it and overcome it. And then you can start harnessing the power of fear.

Posted on Leave a comment

Haunting Halloween Recipes

Our Haunting Halloween Recipes

Halloween is an opportunity to have a little fun, from ridiculous costumes to outrageous parties.

Of course if you’re having a party, you need some suitably spooky food. We have collected and tested a few of our favourites for you.

Starting with a couple of simple appetisers. Tasty finger foods that are sure to impress.

Pumpkin puffs

  • Plain flour, for dusting the baking parchment
  • 1 standard pack of puff pastry
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons paprika
  • 80g unsalted butter cup unsalted butter, melted
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 190 grams finely grated Gruyere cheese
  • 130 grams of finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • Freshly ground pepper

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 190 degrees C. Generously flour two pieces of parchment paper; on each, roll out an unfolded pastry sheet to form a 15-by-13-inch rectangle, about 1/16 inch thick. Refrigerate until firm, about 15 minutes. Meanwhile, stir the paprika into the melted butter.

2. Remove pastry from the refrigerator, and brush off excess flour. Spread a rectangle of pastry with mustard; sprinkle with both cheeses. Season with pepper. Lay a second pastry rectangle on top.

3. Place a sheet of parchment on top of the stacked pastry; using a rolling pin, roll until smooth and pastry layers are sealed together. Remove parchment, and brush top of pastry with butter mixture. Chill until firm, about 30 minutes.

4. With a pumpkin-shaped cookie cutter, cut into 18 to 24 shapes. Immediately place the shapes on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Using a sharp paring knife, score each shape four or five times to make pumpkin ridges. Bake until golden, 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer puffs to a wire rack; let cool slightly before serving.

Fingers and Toes

  • Red or green food colouring, (optional, for finger nails)
  • 24 blanched almonds, halved lengthwise
  • 2 cups warm water, plus 3 litres, plus 1 tablespoon
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • Vegetable oil
  • 640g – 750g plain flour, plus some for the work surface
  • 1 tablespoon coarse salt
  • 2 tablespoons baking powder
  • 1 large egg
  • Pinch of sea salt
  • Fried rosemary (optional, for toes)

Directions

1. Place a small amount of food colouring, if using, in a shallow bowl, and, using a paintbrush, colour the rounded side of each split almond; set aside to dry.

2. Pour 2 cups water into a bowl. Add sugar and stir to dissolve. Sprinkle in the yeast, and let stand until yeast begins to bubble (about 5 minutes). Stir in 120 grams of flour. Add in the salt and then another 400g of flour. Continue beating until dough pulls away from bowl, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the rest of the flour. Beat 1 minute more. If dough is sticky, add a little more flour until the texture is right. Transfer to a lightly floured surface; knead until smooth, 1 minute.

3. Coat a large bowl with cooking spray. Transfer dough to bowl, turning dough to coat with oil. Cover with plastic wrap; let rest in a warm spot to rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

4. Preheat oven to 200 degrees. Bring 3 litres of water water to a boil in a large saucepan; reduce to a simmer. Add baking soda. Lightly coat two baking sheets with cooking spray. Divide dough into quarters. Work with one quarter at a time, and cover remaining dough with plastic wrap. Divide first quarter into 12 pieces. On a lightly floured work surface, roll each piece back and forth with your palm forming a long finger shape, about 3 to 4 inches. Pinch dough in two places to form knuckles. Or, to make toes, roll each piece so that it is slightly shorter and fatter, about 2 inches. Pinch in 1 place to form the knuckle. When 12 fingers or toes are formed, transfer to simmering water. Poach for 1 minute. Using a slotted spoon, transfer fingers to the prepared baking sheets. Repeat with remaining dough, blanching each set of 12 fingers or toes before making more.

5. Beat egg with 1 tablespoon water. Brush pretzel fingers and toes with the egg wash. Using a sharp knife, lightly score each knuckle about three times. Sprinkle with sea salt and rosemary, if using. Position almond nails, pushing them into dough to attach. Bake until golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack.

For spooky coloured food you don’t have to get too creative. This gratin is delicious and there is always something a little ghoulish about black beans and sausages…

Kale and Butternut Squash Gratin

  • 1 medium butternut squash, peeled
  • 1/2 bunch kale (200g to 250g) stems and tough ribs removed, leaves torn into large pieces.
  • Unsalted butter, for baking dish
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 60g finely grated Parmesan
  • Fresh sage leaves
  • 90ml double cream
  • 2 tablespoons panko breadcrumbs

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Slice squash just above bulb. Slice squash neck crosswise into 1/4-inch rounds. Cut squash bulb in half lengthwise. Remove seeds with a spoon; discard. Slice each half crosswise into 1/4-inch half-moons.

2. Set a steamer basket in a large pot filled with 1 inch water; bring to a boil. Add kale, cover, and steam until bright green and wilted, about 3 minutes. Remove from heat; let cool slightly. Squeeze dry.

3. Butter a shallow baking dish (approx 13 by 9 in). Arrange half of sliced squash in dish, shingling pieces to overlap. Season with salt and pepper. Top with kale, season with more salt and pepper, and sprinkle with two thirds of the Parmesan and 2 tablespoons sage. Place remaining squash on top, overlapping pieces slightly; season with more salt and pepper. Pour cream over squash and sprinkle with remaining 2 tablespoons sage.

4. Cover tightly with parchment-lined foil and bake until squash is tender, about 40 minutes. Uncover and sprinkle with panko breadcrumbs and remaining Parmesan. Bake, uncovered, until golden, 10 to 15 minutes more. Let cool slightly before serving.

Black Bean and Sausage

  • 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 450g of smoked sausage, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 3 medium carrots, diced small
  • 2 shallots, diced small
  • Coarse salt and ground pepper
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cans black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 470ml chicken stock
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, plus more for serving
  • 50g plain yogurt, for serving

Directions

1. In a large frying pan, heat oil over medium-high. Add sausage and cook until browned on all sides, about 8 minutes. Transfer to a plate. Add carrots and shallots to skillet and cook until beginning to soften, about 4 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Add garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add black beans and stock and bring mixture to a boil. Add sausage, reduce heat to a rapid simmer, and cook until carrots are tender, about 12 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in parsley. Serve with more parsley and a dollop of yogurt.

Of course you will need something to drink. This one’s for the kids. But if you want a ghastly cocktail try one of these Spooky Halloween Cocktails

Blood Moon Punch

  • 1 litre of orange juice
  • 1 litre water
  • 2 litres grape juice
  • 1 ¼ litres ginger beer
  • 750ml sparkling water
  • 250ml fresh lime juice
  • Candy bats (optional)

Directions

1. For the ice moon, freeze a mixture of orange juice and water in a small bowl, around 8 in diameter. In a large punch bowl, gently stir together grape juice, ginger beer, sparkling water, and fresh lime juice. To release the moon, dip the bottom of the frozen bowl in hot water until the ice starts to melt at the edges. Remove the bowl from the water and turn it onto a plate. Place the moon in the punch, flat-side up, and if desired, arrange candy bats on top.

Halloween

HALLOWEEN

Something special to take trick or treating this Halloween

TRICK OR TREAT YOURSELF THIS HALLOWEEN

We have the put together the perfect collection to complete your costume this Halloween.

Whether an ominous orange, or a groovy green, you’ll definitely have enough space for all of those spooky sweet treats.

So go on… treat yourself!

HBB_SS15_0691
HBB_SS15_0658
HBB_SS15_0694
  • Microfibre Tangerine Large Baglett

    £24.00
    Add to Bag

WIN ONE OF OUR EXPEDITION BAGS

This month 3 lucky people will win one of these beautiful bags.

Simply enter your details below and you could be one of our winners.

4615-AB_3

THE HBB BLOg

5 Reasons to Relish your Fear this Halloween

Being afraid this Halloween isn’t all bad. Here are 5 ways that being made to tremble could actually help you out.

Haunting Halloween Recipes

If you’re having a party, you need some suitably spooky food. We have collected and tested a few of our favourites for you.

Autumnal walks

11 Gorgeous Autumnal Walks to Take your HBB on

It is then a time of year that is perfect for romping over the soft hills of the English countryside. We’ve put together a little list of walks that would be absolutely perfect to take your HBB on.