Posted on Leave a comment

Cardio vs. Strength Training: What should you be doing?

Cardio vs. Strength Training

When it comes to losing weight there is a pretty broad mix of different things people tell you to do. Some swear that cardio is the only way to get thin. Others maintain that strength training (weights) is the way to go.

But who is right? And what should you be doing?

Unsurprisingly, the answer isn’t simple. The results you desire dictate the kind of exercise and how much of it you should undertake.

Before we begin, what do we mean by cardio, and what do we mean by strength training?

Strength Training = exercises designed to build strength and stimulate muscle development through the use of increasing resistance, for example, lifting freeweights or using resistance bands. An intense strength training session could count as a cardio workout if it raises your heart rate enough!

Cardio = cardiovascular exercise. This is any exercise that increases your heart rate dramatically. Examples of cardio are things like running, rowing or using an elliptical machine.

To Build Speed and Strength

Cardio: Exercises such as running should help strengthen leg muscles and increase speed and fitness levels, allowing you to exercise harder, burn more calories and build more strength.

However, your body is great at adapting to change. Just pacing out those 10 miles a week on a treadmill isn’t going to be enough. Your body will get used to the exercise and you’ll quickly find yourself plateauing.
In order to continuously see results, you need to push your body outside its comfort zone with speed training cardio workouts. These can jump-start your metabolism, help burn fat and increase endurance.

Strength Training: As the name suggests this is about building strength. If you want to be faster and stronger, you’re going to want stronger muscles.

More than that, strength training allows you to work muscle groups all over your body, most importantly your core and back muscles. This will help you better support your body weight and maintain good form, resulting in more powerful muscles.

To Burn Calories

Cardio: For burning calories and reducing body mass, cardio has the upper hand. However, it’s not quite as simple as burning off the pounds.

It has been found that people who ostensibly do just cardio burn large amounts of muscle mass along with the fat.

Strength Training: This doesn’t burn as many calories, but it does promote the development of muscle mass. This is important because muscle mass, even when idle requires more fuel for everyday functions than fat does. So, by building up muscle you will burn more calories over time.

It also takes energy to repair the muscles you break down during training. One thing to remember: muscle weighs more than fat. So, if you want to lose weight and only care about what the scales say, adding muscle will slow that process down.

If your goal then is to lose weight quickly, a cardio-heavy exercise regime is going to be best for you. However, if you want to keep the pounds off, you need to put on some muscle at the same time.

Improving Lifestyle

The right exercise can help you improve your quality of life. Cardio is proven to help with a number of ailments, including, but not limited to, helping blood pressure, strengthening your heart and helping with osteoporosis.

That being said, it’s not all good news. Exercises like running, are incredibly hard on your joints and can lead to straining ligaments, wearing out cartilage and other permanent injuries that you might regret in later life. One suggestion we would make is to choose low impact cardio exercises like swimming.

For back health, resistance and muscle training are vital, particularly when focusing on your core. For those suffering from back problems, regular strength exercises can help minimise the effects of these problems on your daily life, while also stopping the build up of intra-abdominal fat.

Combating Stress

Exercising for just 15 – 20 minutes a day, no matter what it is, will help increase your serotonin levels and help your brain produce endorphins which will massively improve your mood.

On top of this, getting your heart rate up helps increase your energy levels by increasing blood flow to your muscles. A short cardio workout will stretch your muscles and break down any lactic acid in your system, reducing stiffness and aching.

Personally, if I am experiencing high levels of stress, I find a high-intensity strength workout consisting of lifting implausibly heavy things helps to vent my frustrations and clear my head.

Avoiding Injuries

Cardio: Regular cardiovascular exercises can help keep your body in shape and perform to its best ability.

However, the repetitive nature of doing cardio alone (that is, without combining it with any strength training) can put serious pressure on your joints, ligaments, muscles and tendons, and potentially result in injury.

Strength Training: Functional strength training teaches your brain how to handle muscle contractions that are quick enough to prevent or minimize injuries.

If you choose exercises that work your core, improve your balance and force you to bend at multiple joints, you are actually protecting your body. Think lunges, rows, squats and pull ups!

Conclusion

Simply put, if you want to lose weight, cardio burns more calories. Yet, as I hope I have made clear, this isn’t so cut and dry…

Cardio doesn’t do a whole lot for your muscles, in fact, a cardio-heavy exercise regime will reduce muscle.

Strength training on the other hand will help you build muscle, which, in the long term will help you burn more calories. ‘For every 3 pounds you gain (of muscle) you can expect to burn an extra 120 calories a day without moving.’

As you get older, resistance training becomes more important, as it improves muscle strength, suppleness and bone density. This will help keep you healthy and mobile and enjoy a better quality of life.

The best solution then is a clever combination of both cardio and strength training. This will help you slash calories, but build muscle at the same time leading to a leaner, stronger you.

Join us and keep up with future blog posts and all things HBB!

Join the list

Get the VIP info on all things Healthy Back Bag, including our newest designs, special releases and monthly giveaways. Plus you’ll get 10% off your first order!

Join the list

Get the VIP info on all things Healthy Back Bag, including our newest designs, special releases and monthly giveaways. Plus you’ll get 10% off your first order!

References

Bernard Gutin, Paule Barbeau, Scott Owens, Christian R Lemmon, Mara Bauman, Jerry Allison, Hyun-Sik Kang, Mark S Litaker; Effects of exercise intensity on cardiovascular fitness, total body composition, and visceral adiposity of obese adolescents, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 75, Issue 5, 1 May 2002, Pages 818–826, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/75.5.818

http://www.health.com/weight-loss/best-exercise-to-lose-weigh

thttps://www.womenshealthmag.com/fitness/g19965862/your-body-on-cardio/ 

https://www.livestrong.com/article/421082-weights-vs-cardio-your-guide-to-the-perfect-body/

Posted on Leave a comment

Perfectly Practical Bags Combining Fashion and Function

practical bags for everyday use

Perfectly Practical Bags Combining Fashion and Function

Three stages of loving an HBB

Firstly, people love the way it looks.

With its unique shape, bright colours and gorgeous seasonal patterns and prints, each HBB allows you to show the world your mood.

Secondly, they adore the way it feels.

They try it on, and it really does make their load feel lighter! Check out our HBB Health section to find out more.

and Finally, they realise they can’t do without it.

The design and practicality of it means going back to a regular bag is no longer an option. Try it for one week and you’ll see what we mean.

Practical Pocketing

One of the things people fall in love with about our bags is the pocketing.

We have carefully and strategically designed the internal pocketing to serve two purposes.

The first is simply to keep your possessions organised. More often than not the internal pocketing of bags just hasn’t been thought through. Leaving a simple cavernous interior that swallows possessions.

Our pockets make organising things easy with space for umbrellas, headphones, your phone, make-up, pens and more. There’s even a clip for your keys.

Healthy Pocketing

There is another reason for this strategic internal functionality.

Balance.

Our bags are all about balance. So our pockets are designed to spread the weight of your possessions throughout the bag, distributing the weight evenly and helping make the bag comfortable and good for your back.

NewPocket_Internal

Non-Slip

Another one of our perfectly practical features is the non-slip strap.

When your straps slip down off the shoulder, people often compensate with a slight twist of the spine. This can lead to back pain.

To address this problem our bags have non-slip straps. This stops the strap sliding down and off the shoulder. This is especially useful when slung over one shoulder but also makes the bag more comfortable when worn cross-body.

Why Are We Healthy?
Posted on Leave a comment

The New HBB Branding

Our New Branding

You may be noticing some changes.

This is because we decided it was time to refresh our look and our message.

We wanted to get to the core of who we are and what our bags mean to our customers.

This was no small challenge.

We began by sitting down and asking the hard questions, what are our customers saying about us? To each other, to their friends, and to us?

With this in mind, we began thinking about the HBB identity, where it currently is and where we wanted it to go.

What became very clear, very quickly was that we are many things to many people. But what is our core message?

Comfortable, Practical, Unique.

After hours of brainstorming these three words appeared at the forefront of the conversation.

From this we came to a brand statement that we believe combines these ideas perfectly.

Beautifully Balanced

Balanced not just in the ergonomic, comfortable shape, but as a part of your lifestyle. Perfect for city slickers and country ramblers; for the office or the beach.

The Look

Next we had to figure out what this would look like.

Mood board after mood board exposed some weird and wild ideas.

We settled in the end with a mixture of abstract imagery that display this idea of balance without immediately identifying our product. Perhaps more importantly though is the idea of colour! Bright block colours that match the innovative, exciting and colourful bags that we make.

How does this actualy look?

What are your thoughts?

Posted on Leave a comment

5 Common Back Problems And How To Fix Them

Five Common Back Problems And How To Fix Them

Looking after your back is an important part of life no matter how young, fit or flexible you are.

Our modern lifestyles are culprits of a huge array of potential back threats. One of the biggest is the chairs we sit in.

But other things, like heavy bags, bad shoes, even too tight trousers can, over time, lead to a series of complicated and even agonising problems.

In this article we outline 5 common back problems faced by the modern person and how we can start to address them.

#1 Slouching in your chair

Humans are not designed to sit for long periods of time. However, the majority of people find themselves sitting for over 10 hours each day.

So, good posture whilst seated is important.

People often slouch unconsciously, as sitting upright requires engaging a number of core muscles. Over time this places strain on the muscles and soft tissue in your lower, and upper back as well as your neck and shoulders.

What to do:

Begin by being aware of your posture. When sitting, keep your back straight, shoulders back and abdomen tucked in. At first this will be uncomfortable as your muscles aren’t conditioned to work like that, but keep at it!

Stand up and walk around every half an hour or so, even go so far as to do a few stretches by your desk.

Exercises to help:

  • Plank/ Side plank
  • Hip thrusts
  • Lunges
  • Seated row

(Scroll to the bottom of the article to see more details on these exercises.)

 

#2 Flat Back

A flat back causes you to stoop. It means your back is straight instead of naturally curved with the pelvis pushed forward.

This can make it difficult to stand for long periods of time, adding all sorts of aches and pains to our back muscles.

Spending long periods sitting down can also contribute to a flat back.

What to do:

Flat back is likely an indication of weak core strength, so you are going to want to start doing regular core strengthening exercises.

  • Plank/ Side plank
  • Leg raises
  • Chest stretches
  • Seated row
  • Pull-ups

The opposite of this is anterior pelvic tilt which causes an excessive curve to the spine. This can be helped with many of the same exercises.

#3 Standing on one Leg

If you’ve been standing for a while you will likely find yourself leaning on one leg, maybe shifting between the two. It may feel more comfortable to do this than standing firmly planted on two legs.

However, when you do this you place extra pressure on the side of your lower back and hip.

If this is something you do a lot, perhaps you work standing up, this can lead to muscle imbalances and muscular strain in the lower back and buttocks.

Other guilty culprits that cause bad lower back and hip problems are things like carrying a heavy bag over one shoulder.

What to do:

Wear a backpack with both straps, distributing the weight evenly. Also, don’t overfill it. If you want a single strap bag, our Healthy Back Bags are specifically designed to contour to your spine, spreading the weight evenly across your shoulders and down your spine.

Strengthen your glutes and lower back.

Do frequent stretches to stretch out those tightening muscles.

Exercises to help:

  • Plank
  • Sidelying leg raises
  • Lunges
  • Squats

#4 Hunching/ Text neck

If you spend your days bent over your keyboard peering into your screen then you might often catch yourself hunching and aches will begin to appear in your back.

Hunching indicates weak upper back muscles and a tight chest.

This type of posture can cause you to develop a rounded upper back with shoulder and back stiffness.

As well as this, when hunched over your keyboard or bent over your phone screen, you may find yourself poking your head forward which can further this problem of tight shoulders.

Correcting a poking chin involves improving your sitting habits and exercises to correct your posture.

What to do:

  • Gently lengthen your neck upwards as you tuck in your chin
  • Seated rows in a gym or pull-ups
  • Chest stretches

 

#5 Rounded shoulders

Rounded shoulders are when you naturally stand with your shoulders rolled forwards. To test this face a mirror and relax. If your knuckles are facing forwards it indicates you have tight chest muscles and a weak upper back.

Rounded shoulders are typically caused by poor posture habits (like slouching), muscle imbalances and focusing too much on certain exercises, such as too much focus on chest strength while neglecting the upper back.

What to do:

Strengthen your upper back and stretch your chest muscles:

  • Plank
  • Seated rows in a gym or pull-ups
  • Chest stretches

 

The Exercises:

Below are just a few exercises you might want to try. If you are unsure how to do any of the exercises, we suggest you ask a professional. Some incorrectly performed exercises can be more damaging than helpful.

#1 Plank and Sideways Plank

Lie on your front propped up on your forearms and toes. Keep your legs straight and hips raised to create a straight and rigid line from head to toe. Don’t allow your lower back to sink during the exercise. Your shoulders should be directly above your elbows.

Alternatively, balance on one side, again keeping the part of your body touching the floor in line with your shoulder and your body rigid and straight.

Focus on keeping your abs contracted during the exercise. Hold this position for as long as you can.

#2 Side leg raises

Lie on your side with one arm tucked under your head. And raise and lower your leg slowly in a controlled fashion.

 

#3 Seated Row (Rowing machine)

This is one of our personal favourites as it works your legs, core, arms and upper back.

Remember to keep your back straight as you move through the motions.

#4 Pull-ups

These require a fair bit of upper body strength. However, you can do assisted pull-ups using various machines in the gym or resistance bands.

#5 Chest stretches

Various yoga poses are excellent for this such as upwards facing dog.

A good stretch to try is standing with your back to a wall, then with your arms at 45 degrees press back against the wall.

#6 Lunges

Step into a lunge lowering one knee to the floor and then moving back into a standing position.

Repeat this with alternating legs ten times (each side).

#7 Squats

With your feet firmly planted on the floor shoulder width apart, lower yourself down as low as you can go without lifting your heels.

Keep your back straight and stay as upright as possible. You should feel like your are about to fall backwards.

A good trick for beginners is to place a chair or box behind you, gently touch the chair or box and then stand up again back up again. This will stop you from tipping backwards.

Alternatively, put something under your heels to tilt you forwards, allowing you to drop further into the squat.

You can find more detail on many of these exercises and on dealing with back problems online in places like the NHS health blog 

 

Share your knowledge of dealing with back pain in the comment section below.

Posted on Leave a comment

11 Gorgeous Autumnal Walks to Take your HBB on

Autumnal walks

11 Gorgeous Autumnal Walks

Autumnal walks, whilst having a bit of a chill factor, hold some of the most beautiful landscapes of the year. The trees turn to golden browns and gorgeous reds and oranges. The air, crisp with a hint of those colder days to come.

It is then a time of year that is perfect for romping over the soft hills of the English countryside.

So, we thought we might put together a little list of walks that would be absolutely perfect to take your HBB on.

SHOP the Full HBB Range NOW

If you like this article, or perhaps have a favourite walk to share, feel free to leave a comment in the box below.

In the South West

1. Stourhead, Wiltshire – King Alfred’s Tower walk

This 5 mile walk takes you up through beautiful woodlands to King Alfred’s Tower (open at weekends only, 12-4pm throughout October), a 160ft high folly designed for Stourhead’s owner Henry Hoare II in 1772. It is believed to mark the site where King Alfred the Great rallied his troops in 878. Don’t forget to stop and enjoy the spectacular views across the lake in the landscape garden, with the deep autumnal hues of red, russet and yellow from the surrounding trees. Take your time to soak up all the features of this masterpiece, including the tranquil garden of the South Lawn, the shaded banks running down to the lake and the Grotto, which contains a statue of a sleeping nymph.

Get a map of the walking trail here

Autumnal walks
Credit: Marilyn Peddle https://www.flickr.com/photos/marilynjane/4546584778

2. Castle Drogo, Devon – Teign Gorge walk

This is one of the most famous walks on Dartmoor. The route takes you past the imposing bulk of Castle Drogo – which was the last castle to be built in England, these areas are rich in history, with incredible views and abundant wildlife.

Then there is Fingle Bridge, a popular focal point for budding photographers, and the perfect spot for a game of Poohsticks in the river Teign. The return journey follows the river’s path through dense oak woodland where the foliage turns to vibrant shades of yellow and orange. If you look up you might just catch a glimpse of the castle above the trees.

Get a map of the walking trail here.

Credit: WyrdLight.com

3. Kingston Lacy, Dorset – Beech Avenue and Droves walk

This 3.8 mile walk takes you round the beautiful network of droves, along the stunning 1835 Beech Avenue and back along the outskirts of the Kingston Lacy parkland. The Avenue began life in 1835 when William John Bankes planted 731 trees along the side of the newly built road. The tree canopy now forms a beautiful tunnel of russet colour during the autumn months. The National Trust is now working to conserve this stunning visual landmark by replacing lost beeches with hornbeam trees, which also provide beautiful autumn colour, but are more suited to the British climate.

Get a map of the walking trail here

4. Brownsea Island, Dorset – Rich Reds of Brownsea walk

Brownsea’s unspoiled landscape provides a peaceful haven for visitors seeking a bit of autumn colour. From sweet chestnuts and beeches to hazel trees and scarlet oaks from North America, there are a whole range of bright hues to enjoy. Even the local wildlife adds to the vibrant atmosphere with migrant redstarts and the local population of red squirrels as the stars of the show. This easy walk will take you round the island to enjoy all the delights of the season with sweeping coastal views thrown in for good measure.

Get a map of the walking trail here

5. Heddon Valley, North Devon – Heddon Valley to Woody Bay walk

Nestled on the West Exmoor coast it’s easy to see why the Heddon Valley was a favourite with the Romantic poets. In autumn the path through the valley is full of vibrant yellow gorse, which scents the air with the smell of coconuts all the way down to the sea at Heddon’s Mouth. There are also plenty of walking routes higher up, including an historic 19th-century carriageway and part of the South West Coast Path, which run across some of England’s most dramatic coastal cliffs. Those prepared to brave the challenging terrain will be rewarded with stunning coastal views across the Bristol Channel to Wales.

Get a map of the walking trail here

Photo © Basher Eyre (cc-by-sa/2.0)

Near London and the South East

6. Winkworth Arboretum, Surrey – Winkworth to Oakhurst walk

During the autumn months the splendour of Winkworth Arboretum really comes to life with rich, blazing colour from the Japanese, American and Norwegian maples. This 2.5 mile walk weaves its way through the woodland to the top of Hydon’s Ball, where you can enjoy spectacular views across the Surrey landscape. From here the route carries on to the charming village of Hambledon where you will discover Oakhurst Cottage, a delightful 16th-century labourer’s home which has remained largely unchanged for the past hundred years or more.

Get a map of the walking trail here

7. Emmetts Garden, Kent – Weardale walk

This beautiful circular walk links Emmetts Garden and Chartwell (formerly home to Winston Churchill), passing through the woodland areas of Toys Hill and Hosey Common. Emmetts garden has a beautiful display of autumn colour due to its variety of exotic trees and shrubs, all surrounded by acres of wild native woodland. Keep an eye out for the Acers and Katsura Toffa trees, and see if you can smell the latter filling the air with a sweet toffee scent.

Get a map of the walking trail here

Photo © Oast House Archive (cc-by-sa/2.0)

8. Devil’s Dyke, West Sussex – Saddlescombe Farm and Newtimber walk

Only five miles north of Brighton, Devil’s Dyke is full of stunning vistas – including a panorama which the Romantic painter John Constable described as ‘the grandest view in the world’. From a working farm nestled among rolling hills to the remains of Iron Age ramparts and old chalk pits, there is plenty to see in this landscape. A colourful habitat all year round, in September the hill-barrows at Newtimber become even more vibrant when the flowers transform the hillside into a beautiful carpet of purple.

Get a map of the walking trail here

9. Wicken Fen Nature Reserve, Cambridgeshire – Wicken Fen Boardwalk trail

Wicken Fen may not have any woodland, but it’s still possible to see stunning autumn colour on a walk around the reserve. In September the sedge turns an amazing russet colour, which becomes golden in the evenings as the setting sun illuminates the leaves. During the Second World War Dig for Victory campaign, the war office turned the fen into arable land. Restoration of the area is now being carried out, and every visit you make to Wicken Fen helps the National Trust to care for the plants and wildlife that have made a home here.

Get a map of the walking trail here

Credit: Andrew Stawarz https://www.flickr.com/photos/stawarz/4318620433

In the Midlands

10. Attingham Park, Shropshire – A Light Autumnal Walk

Explore the changing colours of the deer park with a walk taking in views over the open landscape to the river, and of the orange-gold trees that mark the start of the woodland. Kids will love crunching leaves underfoot or trying to catch them as they fall from the trees. Keen-eyed adventurers might also be able to spot some of the resident fallow deer herd camouflaged among the brown bracken and ferns.

Get a map of the walking trail here

James Humphreys - SalopianJames (CC BY-SA 3.0)

11. Belton House, Lincolnshire – Belton Park Walk

Autumn reds, yellows and golden browns can be found all over Belton, from the adventure playground and parkland, to the tranquil views overlooking the boating lakes. The magical misty mornings and crisp, clear days of autumn are an ideal time to enjoy the wonderful succession of changing colours. As you explore the estate on this walk, you can rustle your way through fallen leaves and enjoy the gorgeous golds and yellows of the lime trees along the cobbled drive. Closer to the house, rich ruby and russet creepers clad the honey-coloured walls of the West Courtyard, where the sharp but sweet aroma of ripening quinces lingers on the air.

Get a map of the walking trail here

Packing for the Weekend

PACKING FOR A WEEKEND AWAY Written by Fiona Ingham The latest from our House of Colour blogger Fiona Ingham I’m not planning a major break away this Summer, but I’m getting quite [...]

Travel Ready with HBB

TRAVEL READY WITH HBB Travel with peace of mind It's Summer, the time of country walks and longer days. A time for travel on foreign continents in search of sun, exploring hidden [...]

Essential Travel items you didn’t know you needed

Essential Travel Gadgets you Didn't know you Needed Travelling is important. Experiencing new cultures, broadening your understanding of the world and most importantly, letting off a little steam and relaxing. Travel is [...]

Posted on Leave a comment

8 interesting, alternative yoga options to try out

traditional yoga

1

Eight Alternative Yoga Classes to try out

Yoga – the word holds connotations of deep breathing, stillness, meditation and the silent surrounds of India’s mountain tops or colourful Mandalas. Well, this isn’t for everyone. Some people need something a little more fast-paced or intense.

So we asked ourselves, just how strange do yoga practices get?

We did a little digging and found 8 alternative yoga options that you might like to try if traditional yoga isn’t doing it for you.

  1. Rocket Yoga

Trending amongst yoga aficionados, it’s a cross between ashtanga and vinyasa, and is often thought of as the original ‘power yoga’. Developed by Larry Schultz in 1980s San Francisco, the style is meant to be more intense than traditional yoga, with faster more fluid movements and transitions.

Teachers insist that you will quickly catch on and be running through the sequences at full speed in no time at all. APart of the appeal we think is that you don’t have to master each pose before moving onto the next. It breaks a few of the traditional rules making yoga more accessible to everyone.

 

  1. Hot Pod Yoga

This takes place in what is essentially an inflatable tent (patented by Hot Pod Yoga), the space is dark, cosy, and heated to a warming 37°C. The class is an hour long and combines vinyasa flow and pilates core exercises.

Stretching and strengthening at the same time. Based in Brixton, Notting Hill and London Fields, the portable studios are also fully equipped to pop up at any requested location, be that at your birthday or at work.

Credit: Hot Pod Yoga 

  1. Barre

We’ve mentioned Barre class before, as Nancy is a big fan. These classes involve techniques from dance, yoga and fitness. The specific sequences will encourage muscles to stretch and strengthen, leaving you calm and relaxed.

Be prepared to entangle yourself in long and twisting positions.

  1. Boxing Yoga

Boxing turned to yoga, or yoga turned into boxing. Whichever way round it is the aim is to give yoga a more athletic spin.

For boxers, it is a chance to practice breathing techniques and work on balance, flexibility and stretches. For yogis, it is a chance to learn a few boxing techniques and stances.

Total Boxer now train a variety of sporting clubs.

  1. Laughter Yoga

Studies show that the actual act of laughing can make you happy. We know that sounds obvious and silly but bear with us here.

Laughter yoga is designed to be a laugh, it is designed to make you smile, to be good fun. But it still works your core muscles and combines some of the meditative ideologies from traditional yoga. The School of Laughter Yoga has regular meet-ups near the Southbank.

  1. AcroYoga

Acroyoga combines partner acrobatics with yoga techniques. It is much more than a flashy form of yoga though. It’s main purpose is to help build real human connection and trust in others.

The positions require a base, a flyer, and perhaps most importantly the spotter. It s more about technique than strength, meaning you don’t need to be a professional gymnast to do these moves.

You can trial the classes with Jaqui Wan at Gogo Yoga near Columbia Road, British School of Shiatsu in Finsbury Park and The Place near Euston.

  1. Antigravity Yoga

Antigravity yoga is exactly what it sounds like. Learn to fly at your yoga class. Dangle from silk ropes hanging from the ceiling, whilst moving through a variety of positions and holds that are sure to work your core to the limits.

It may sound daunting to swing from the ceiling doing yoga, but as with anything, the more you do the better you’ll become, and the more you’ll begin to enjoy the sense of freedom that comes from defying gravity.

  1. Stand-Up Paddle Yoga

Yoga is about balance, what better way to advance your balancing skills than by decreasing the stability of the surface you are on.

In the summer months you can try this out in Paddington Basin. The surf board that becomes your new floating yoga mat? Participants can feel free to wear their usual yoga clothing, however wetsuits are available on request, and people who are not entirely comfortable on water can also wear buoyancy aids. Private lessons are available however, in London this one is a seasonal yoga class. No one wants to be taking a tumble in the Thames during winter.

 

Tell us what you think of these… Have we missed any alternative yogas that you love? Let us know in the comment section below!